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Blogs

Resilient communications

 

Resilient communications

We don’t notice how dependent we have become on our mobile networks, until they fail. Only then, we notice that it’s not obvious being able to communicate anywhere, anytime. Those moments make us realize just how vulnerable we are. That is still to overlook when the signal reception drastically deteriorates on New Year’s Eve, when everybody wants to convey their best wishes at the same time. A power failure that causes a mast to breakdown, which in turn overloads another nearby mast, is generally resolved quickly as well.

However, what if there is a huge calamity, like an earthquake or a flood? The network traffic during the tsunami in Japan was fifty to sixty times larger than usual. Even if the infrastructure itself hasn’t been damaged, the increased demand on the mobile communication system causes the network to fail. In a situation where the emergency services should also be reachable, this is an absolute disaster.

How do we make the network accessible again? By excluding a part of the calls in the area surrounding the calamity: ‘cell barring’. First-aid workers and others, who need the mobile network the most, are prioritized by immediate and accurate network interventions. During the recent terrorist attacks on Brussels, users, including emergency services, received the request not to call, but to use WhatsApp: under the given circumstances this was definitely not the most useful means of communication.

Using LIMA Network Protect would have prevented this: a powerful tool from Group 2000, for managing critical networks and cell barring. By deploying this tool, we get future-proof ‘smart cities’ that communicate resilient.

 

Blogs

Why your phone doesn’t work during terrorists attacks

 

Why your phone doesn’t work during terrorists attacks

When terrorists attack, cell phone networks fail. They go down during disasters, attacks and even at big events. What causes the network overload?

In the fog of disaster, hundreds of thousands of people trying to call their loved ones, police forces, fire departments, first aid support, everybody has a reason to communicate with the first thing they have in their hand, their cell phone…

Mobile networks simply clogged up as telecom providers coped with a massive and unexpected surge. In the aftermath of natural disasters, terrorist attacks, and anomalous incidents worldwide, telecommunications networks simply can’t cope with the sharp increase in call volume. Mobile networks have bandwidth that is more than sufficient 99% of the time. However, when disaster strikes, the decentralized nature of the network means that whole geographic regions can be knocked out by increased call volume.

Group 2000 has developed a solution where Mobile Network Operators control their networks with a simple push of a button to keep communication lines open at all times where it is most needed.

LIMA Network Protect is a modular solution that can protect the mobile network against overload situations caused by disasters and other planned or unplanned events. It does this by barring at cell level. LIMA Network Protect is a complete solution for Network and Subscriber Barring Control that is built around a central management system. It integrates all necessary network equipment, databases and includes a Graphical User Interface to visualize the network and affected areas. Cells can be bared at access class level enabling the operator to differentiate between the barring of private subscribers and emergency services.

 

Blogs

Making Europe’s external frontiers and stadiums more secure

 

Making Europe’s external frontiers and stadiums more secure

Group 2000 is launching an effective tool for further securing Europe’s external frontiers with the introduction of LIMA Biometric Identity Surveillance.

This new generation of 3D facial recognition represents the next step forward. The system not only looks at the characteristics ‘on the surface’, but also at bone structures in the skull which are unique to every individual. There is simply any point in acquiring a new identity through plastic surgery any more. A facial scan can be carried out on everyone crossing the border and a check conducted against existing photo databases of people who have previously been detained for terrorism or human trafficking or are otherwise undesirable.

With the current refugee problem the system can also be crucial in establishing the identity of people who arrive at Europe’s external frontiers. A facial scan which cannot be falisified can be readily linked to existing databases and blacklists. People with malevolent intentions can therefore be identified more quickly than with the current labour-intensive registration system, which is not completely reliable.

For example, if evidence is lacking because the identity papers have been ‘lost’ between arrival at the airport and the asylum application, the LIMA facial scan carried out on all passengers at the gate can be decisive in determining what steps are taken, since the scan shows which faces arrived on which flights. In the case of a positive match the original airline can return the person concerned back to where they came from.

The system can also help with the ongoing problem of football hooligans who are subject to stadium bans. It has repeatedly shown that there are serious flaws in enforcing these stadium bans.
By installing the 3D camera system at the entrance gates, it is possible to check entirely automatically, quickly and accurately for every visitor whether that person is on the blacklist.

We are constantly working on new high-tech solutions to make society as safe as possible.